7 Other Stone Circles Aside From Stonehenge

Share on twitter Tweet
Share on facebook Share

Trivial Diversions

7 Other Stone Circles Aside From Stonehenge

7 Other Stone Circles Aside From Stonehenge

You’re likely familiar with Stonehenge in south central England, but did you know that the locals there were not the only ancient societies busy erecting stone circles? Check out these different stone monuments found throughout the world.

Ring of Brodgar

Dating back to the Neolithic Era (or New Stone Age), the Ring of Brodgar is located on the largest island in Orkney, Scotland. At one point, there were around 60 stones, but by the end of the 20th century, only 27 remained standing. The site hasn’t been fully excavated, so there may be more information we don’t yet know.

brogdar

Drombeg stone circle

Located in County Cork, Ireland, the Drombeg stone circle was used during the Bronze Age, with radiocarbon dating placing its age around 1100 to 800 BC. It includes 17 closely-spaced stones.

drombeg

Atlit Yam

An underwater Neolithic village was found off the coast of Israel, and it includes a submerged stone circle, which may be the oldest known stone circle to have been found — it dates back to about 6300 to 7000 BC. It was arranged around a freshwater spring and may have been used in water rituals.

atlit-yam

Castlerigg stone circle

You’ll find the Castlerigg stone circle in northwest England, near the market town of Keswick. It dates back to around 3200 BC and consists of around 40 stones, the largest of which weighs around 16 tons.

castlerigg

Swinside

Swinside is a gorgeous, nearly perfect stone circle also located in northwest England, in southern Cumbria. There are currently 55 stones present, down from 60 that were originally there.

swinside

Doll Tor

A small stone circle, consisting of six standing stones, is located in Derbyshire, England. It was erected in the Bronze Age, and during one of the excavation attempts, a few stones were smashed and repaired with concrete.

doll-tor

The Merry Maidens

In Cornwall, England, you can find 19 granite stones forming a complete circle. At one point, there were stones from a second stone circle in the area, but all of those stones had disappeared by the end of the 19th century.

merry-maidens

Related topics ancient history, ancient rituals, stone circle, stone rings
Next post Previous post

Your reaction to this post?

  • LOL

    1

  • Money

    0

  • Cool

    0

  • Fail

    0

  • Cry

    0

  • Geek

    0

  • Angry

    0

  • WTF

    0

  • Crazy

    0

  • Love

    0

You may also like

5557 Views
Foxcatcher: A Look At The Real John Du Pont
History

Foxcatcher: A Look At The Real John Du Pont

John Du Pont, the heir to the chemical fortune, is

5647 Views
11 Facts About the History of Confetti
Lifestyle

11 Facts About the History of Confetti

Confetti enjoys a fairly simple existence as a New Year’s

11953 Views
17 Facts About The Statue Of Liberty
Geography

17 Facts About The Statue Of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty is the epitome of freedom for